INFORMATION CHANGE THE WORLD

International Journal of Modern Education and Computer Science (IJMECS)

ISSN: 2075-0161 (Print), ISSN: 2075-017X (Online)

Published By: MECS Press

IJMECS Vol.6, No.4, Apr. 2014

A Proposed Model for IT Disaster Recovery Plan

Full Text (PDF, 343KB), PP.57-67


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Author(s)

Hossam Abdel Rahman Mohamed

Index Terms

IT Disaster Recovery;Datacenter Continuity;Risk Management;Recovery Strategy

Abstract

IT disaster recovery planning is no longer an option. Reliable IT services have become an integral part of most business processes. To ensure the continued provision of information technology, firms must engage in IT disaster recovery planning. Surprisingly, there is little research on this topic. IT disaster recovery planning has not been fully conceptualized in mainstream IT research. A previously framework for assessing the degree of IT disaster recovery planning. Practitioners can use this study to guide IT disaster recovery planning. Our Disaster Recovery Plan is designed to ensure the continuation of vital business processes in the event that a disaster occurs. This plan will provide an effective solution that can be used to recover all vital business processes within the required time frame using vital records that are stored off-site. This Plan is just one of several plans that will provide procedures to handle emergency situations. These plans can be utilized individually but are designed to support one another. The first phase is a Functional Teams and Responsibilities the Crisis Management Plan. This phase allows the ability to handle high-level coordination activities surrounding any crisis situation. We will also discuss the development, finally maintenance and testing of the Disaster Recovery Plan.

Cite This Paper

Hossam Abdel Rahman Mohamed,"A Proposed Model for IT Disaster Recovery Plan", IJMECS, vol.6, no.4, pp.57-67, 2014.DOI: 10.5815/ijmecs.2014.04.08

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